YELLOW TOURISM CONFERENCE 2017, Corfu, Greece – Call for Papers

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Call for Papers!
Yellow Tourism Conference 2017- Register Now!

Scope

Crime and Corruption do not merely constitute an intriguing holiday theme (and having common characteristics with the area of ͚Dark Tourism͛); but they also constitute a bitter reality counting many victims. Tourism is a globalised business sector impacting the livelihood of millions of people in all parts of the world. As any other ͚big business͛, where significant circuits of capital and information, and power imbalances exist, tourism is fertile ground for corruption and economic crime.Concurrently, the globalised scope of the tourism industry renders it into a very challenging field of action for national legislators and law enforcement agencies. Novel tourist experiences, interactions with unknown environments and places, and a sense of freedom from care, represent core elements of the holiday experience. For these very reasons, holidays inherently entail a number of dangers for tourists, rendering them vulnerable to crime. Conversely, the anonymity that is combined with the consumerist/hedonistic mindset of many tourists, may well lead to irresponsible and even criminal, behaviour towards locals and others. Although, the casualties of mainly politically-motivated terrorism are few worldwide, safety and security issues related to terror are extensively covered in tourism literature. In contrast, and despite of their quantitatively greater impact on the holiday experience, economic criminality and corruption have received relatively little attention in tourism scholarship. We seek to address this imbalance with this action.
The aim of this project “Yellow Tourism” is to place crime and corruption in the tourism-research agenda, expanding the interdisciplinary scope of tourism to include perspectives from law, business, economics, political science and the social and behavioural sciences. Contributing fields may include, but not be limited to the following:

Law,
Criminology,
Business ethics,
Behavioural and social psychology,
Critical tourism studies,
Information systems / Data
Geography

The project “Yellow Crime” is carried out by a research consortium consisting of the Ionian University of Corfu, Greece, the University of Bremerhafen Germany, the Ovidious University of Constanta, Rumania and Bournemouth University, U.K.

The two kick-off events of “Yellow-Tourism” project are planned for October/November 2016 and April 2017 in Corfu, Greece

Call for Papers!

Yellow Tourism Conference 2017- Register Now!

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First Regional AML/TF Conference of the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force

thebahamasweekly.com – First Regional Anti-Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing Conference of the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force.

Money launderers constantly evolving

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Money launderers constantly evolving
Publicado el Apr 16, 2012

The schemes used by cartel financiers are constantly evolving as authorities find new money-laundering methods and take steps to shut them down.
When Congress passed the Patriot Act in 2001, it put in place reporting requirements for cash deposits that forced money launderers, including those for Mexican cartels, to change their tactics, said Jim Dowling, managing director of the Dowling Advisory Group and former Anti-Money Laundering Advisor to the White House Drug Policy Office.
Billions of dollars that was being deposited in U.S. banks started going to Mexico before slipping into the U.S. economy, Dowling said.
“The U.S. Patriot Act made it difficult for these guys to put cash into bank accounts,” Dowling said. “So the U.S. government wasn’t looking at what was going out of the country, and the Mexican government certainly wasn’t looking at what was coming in.”
Such operations use three stages, Dowling said: placement, layering and integration.
In the placement stage, defendants in the San Antonio cases are accused of smuggling cash from drug sales in such cities as Atlanta, Houston and Las Vegas into Mexico, where it was deposited in bank accounts.
In the layering stage, prosecutors allege, the money was transferred from Mexico to bank accounts in the U.S. controlled by the accused money launderers.
And in the final stage, integration, the money was used to purchase land and open restaurants. Once the launderers have businesses, they can wash money through them, Dowling said.
“Now you don’t have to ship the money down to Mexico,” he said. “You have to pay a tax on it, but that’s a small fee for laundering money that’s clean. Now you’re at the full integration.”
Dowling, who’s worked undercover investigating money-laundering cases, said the money side of the operation is incredibly high-stakes. A mule losing a load of drugs is rarely punished. Losing a load of cash could cost a smuggler his life.
Neither the U.S. nor Mexico is doing a sufficient job of attacking the cartels’ finances, said a former U.S. law enforcement official who asked to remain anonymous for safety reasons.
“The truth is, neither government can get into those networks, so progress is slow,” he said. “Interdicting bulk cash is not attacking money laundering and getting a cash load is happenstance. Money laundering is a black hole, in large part. There are good cases, but they are far and few, compared to the amount of drug-related proceeds that are being generated.”

*Mysanantonio.com (reprinted from antimoneylaundering.us)